New HIV infections down by 18% in the United States of America

by Editorial Staff - 2017.02.17
New HIV infections down by 18% in the United States of America
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New evidence released shows that annual new HIV infections in the United States of America fell by 18% between 2008 and 2014, but that not all groups are benefitting equally. According to the estimates released by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) while the number of new HIV infections among people who inject drugs fell by 56% from 2008 to 2014, gay and bisexual men remain the most at risk group. Certain groups within this community remain at particular risk: gay men aged 25-34; Latino gay and bisexual males; black gay and bisexual men. The drop in new HIV infections also varied by location, with states and districts showing drops of up to 10% annually, for example Washington, DC, while others experienced lower declines—for example Texas, with a 2% annual drop—or remained stable. No states showed increases in new HIV infections, however. The CDC attributes the 18% decline from 2008 to 2014 in large part to the increased number of people living with HIV knowing their HIV status, accessing treatment and becoming virally suppressed. But experts agree that is important to continue strengthening programs and services to ensure the improving of health outcomes and reducing infections across all communities and populations.