Making it easier for ADHD sufferers to renew their driving licence

by Veronica Grilli - 2013.03.15

In Holland, it has become easier for people suffering from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to renew their driving licence. GPs are now able to certify an individual’s fitness for driving. There is no longer a need for a special medical examination every three or five years, although exceptions can be made on a case by case basis. The number of years a patient has been driving will also be a determinant factor in assessing reliability. The new regulations are part of a reform of Dutch infrastructure and transport, recently drawn up by the government. The aim of the measures is to make life easier for people with attention disorders. To date, there are no statistics on ADHD in the Netherlands. However, it’s estimated that about 3% of residents aged between 18 and 44 years suffer from some form of ADHD, as well as about 8% of children.

Published in Mental disability.
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