Transplantation of organs from euthanasia

by Letizia Orlandi - 2012.11.08

Belgium is the world leader in organ removal after euthanasia. The practice of transplanting organs from patients who die after voluntary euthanasia is becoming relatively common in Belgium. Recently there had already been nine cases. Over the next three years there appear to have been another five. This has been done only once elsewhere in the world, in neighbouring Holland. Only a small proportion of euthanased patients are able to donate organs, since most of them are terminally ill with cancer. About 1,100 Belgians were euthanased in 2011. Most of the patient donors have muscular or neurological disorders.

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