Antiprohibitionist Canadians

by Letizia Orlandi - 2012.07.03
Antiprohibitionist Canadians
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That came after similar calls from the Global Commission on Drug Policy. Two-thirds of Canadians think the law should be changed so that people caught with small amounts of marijuana no longer face criminal penalties or fines, a new poll has found. The nationwide survey for Postmedia News and Global TV, which examined the state of Canadian values, revealed that the public is distinctly offside with the Harper government on the issue.

Published in Drug addiction.
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